5 Tips for Homeschooling Multiple Kids

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Before I started homeschooling, I didn’t see how it was even possible to effectively homeschool more than one child, or more than one grade level. But as I’ve grown into this thing called homeschooling, I’ve discovered a few handy tips for other moms like myself, who have multiple children they are trying to homeschool.

5 Tips for Homeschooling Multiple Kids

Tip #1: Do as much together as a group as possible. In order to grasp this, you may have to tell your brain that traditional classrooms per grade level are NOT the only way to learn. That is just one of the ways children can learn. For example, our family lumps our eight, nine and ten year old’s together for history, science & read aloud’s. I lump all five kids together for Bible.

Tip #2: While one group (or child) works independently or has a break, work with another child. It gives you one-on-one time with each child by freeing your brain from a million questions from the rest of the kids who all need help. I like to give my older kids a break, while I work with my kindergartner and preschooler. The older kids can very easily occupy themselves, and the younger ones absolutely need my complete attention in order to retain anything whatsoever.

Tip #3: Remember that each child is a little smarter than their younger sibling, because they’ve learned more. They have wisdom to share with the next child (or children) down. Use them! Let them help answer a math question or do flashcards with a sibling. Occasionally this is ineffective as a fight or quarrel will breakout. But usually I’ve found that the older child loves the power, and the little one feels blessed by the attention.

Tip #4: Organization is key! Keeping your books and worksheets organized, is so very important. If you live in a state that requires documentation (like I do), you also need to be organized to show your evaluator all that you’ve done this year. Stay organized as you go, do not procrastinate and tell yourself you’ll get to it on your next break. Believe me…it never happens! Something will inevitably come up. I try to go a week at a time, making sure I have my grades, days we did school marked, and that we are staying on track with our curriculum.

Tip #5: Take time out for project days. Sometimes it can be so hard to stray from the detailed outlined schedule, but I have found that the days I do break free from the order of it all, are the days my kids remember. For example my older three daughters have been studying the Incans and Aztecs. So today we took a break from reading (the boring book as they call it) and we made homemade clay, and built an Aztec city. They had a great time, and tomorrow they can paint it. I know projects are work for you as the mom. But if you plan a project that all the kids can do (even if they are different) it can be so freeing to just work at something other than workbooks and quizzes.

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